Back to Health: Making Up for Lost Time

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The COVID-19 crisis has laid bare systemic inequities that will have to be addressed if we are ever going to build more sustainable, resilient, and inclusive societies. It has shown us that inadequate public-health capacity in one place can become a problem for people everywhere. And it has reminded us that the poorest and most vulnerable always bear the brunt of our collective failures.

In getting back to health, it is critical that these communities be at the heart of our recovery efforts. Society-level crises are occasions for starting anew, rethinking old assumptions, and leveraging human ingenuity and creativity. Tragically, the pandemic has set back the sustainable development agenda in countless ways. Yet by shining a spotlight on issues that can no longer be ignored, and by restoring science to its proper place at the center of our decision-making processes, the crisis can – indeed, must – serve as a wake-up call.

At our upcoming event on global health and development, leading experts will examine the immediate legacy of the pandemic and explore solutions for bringing all communities and societies back to health.

Speakers

Agenda

Moderator: Jo Coburn 
Session One – Preventing the Next Pandemic Far from being a “black swan” event, the COVID-19 pandemic was not only foreseeable but actually foreseen by public-health experts. What will it take to ensure that this tragic episode is never repeated?
1:00PM Opening Remarks  Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director-General of the World Health Organization
1:05PM Panel Discussion and Q&A with International Media
  1. Agnes Binagwaho, Former Minister of Health of Rwanda, Vice Chancellor of the University of Global Health Equity
  2. Sally C. Davies, UK Special Envoy on Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR)
  3. Tom Frieden, Former Director of the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, President and CEO of Resolve to Save Lives
  4. David Miliband, President and CEO of the International Rescue Committee
1:55PM Closing Remarks  Seth Berkley, CEO of Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance
2:00PM Closing Remarks  Gro Harlem Brundtland, Former Director-General of the World Health Organization, Member of The  Elders
2:05PM Break
Session Two – The Economics of Universal Health Coverage Although the idea of universal health coverage is simple, achieving it will be neither easy nor straightforward. How and to what extent should this principle be factored into the broader economic development strategy for low- and middle-income countries after the pandemic?
2:20PM Opening Remarks  Werner Hoyer, President of the European Investment Bank
2:25PM Panel Discussion and Q&A with International Media 
  1. Ann Aerts, Head of the Novartis Foundation
  2. Angus Deaton, Nobel laureate in economics
  3. Carl Manlan, Vice President of Social Impact for CEMEA at Visa
  4. Nancy Qian, Professor of Managerial Economics and Decision Sciences at Northwestern University's Kellogg School of Management
3:15PM Closing Remarks  Julia Gillard, Former Prime Minister of Australia, Chair of the Board of Directors of the Global  Partnership for Education

Our Partners

What they are saying

  1. Many people here at the bank agree that this was the most professional looking, well moderated, and entertaining event we have supported or participated in... The speakers were top-level and highly knowledgable throughout, and the whole design was very slick.

    Dirk Heilmann
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